'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Humility will Always go clad in scarlet Pride is too good for gold' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Heretics' by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

‘Humility will
Always go clad in scarlet
Pride is too good for gold’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Heretics’ by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

'Humility will Always go clad in scarlet Pride is too good for gold' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Heretics' by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

‘Humility will
Always go clad in scarlet
Pride is too good for gold’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Heretics’ by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

'Running up Meath Street With tiny ears like new shells Just lost his young wife' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'The Glamour of Dublin' by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

‘Running up Meath Street
With tiny ears like new shells
Just lost his young wife’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘The Glamour of Dublin’ by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

'Running up Meath Street With tiny ears like new shells Just lost his young wife' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'The Glamour of Dublin' by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

‘Running up Meath Street
With tiny ears like new shells
Just lost his young wife’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘The Glamour of Dublin’ by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

'A crammed battle With major elements of spite Just then a message' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Patton: Ordeal and Triumph' by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘A crammed battle
With major elements of spite
Just then a message’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Patton: Ordeal and Triumph’ by Ladislas Farago (1969)

'A crammed battle With major elements of spite Just then a message' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Patton: Ordeal and Triumph' by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘A crammed battle
With major elements of spite
Just then a message’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Patton: Ordeal and Triumph’ by Ladislas Farago (1969)

"Concerning the spoils Use indulgence and command without loud speaking' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Sales Koran'.

“Concerning the spoils
Use indulgence and command
without loud speaking’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Sales Koran’.

"Concerning the spoils Use indulgence and command without loud speaking' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Sales Koran'.

“Concerning the spoils
Use indulgence and command
without loud speaking’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Sales Koran’.

‘Haiku House’ was a collaborative interdisciplinary event looking at the Haiku form, which took place at The Guesthouse in July 2014 as part of The Avant Festival. Cork based visual artist and curator Róisín Foley and Helen Horgan of The LFTT worked together for the event. Haiku’s were written by Helen Horgan using the texts from the library. Foley responded to these texts with delicate poetic sculptural interventions. For more or Róisíns work see http://roisinfoley.wordpress.com/

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

In May 2013 Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy performed live in The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’. Mick and Irene regularly perform as part of sound-art and performance collective Strange Attractor. They are both instrumental in the experimental sound-art scene which Cork city has become renowned for, which also includes Danny McCarthy David Stalling and Anthony Kelly and others. https://www.facebook.com/StrangeAttractorIreland

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

60.HIGHLANES

Katherine Atkinson performs on the altar of Highlanes Gallery in response to the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ (2013)

In August 2013 violinist and performance artist Katherine Atkinson was  invited to respond to The LFTT exhibition Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation at Highlanes Gallery. She decided to stem her performance quite literally from the individual works themselves, enacting an intimate one-one-one engagement with the textures and forms they evoked. It was quite ‘spellbinding’!

Katherine’s work is inspired by physical theatre, using strong visual images as part of the performance. When performing the violin becomes an extension of her physical self, another part of her body as well as an extension of her voice. Inspired by physical theatre, Atkinson uses strong visual images as part of her performance, often responding to specific architectures and environments in an exploration of the boundaries between public and private space.

Katherine says of her practice “I am interested in testing performance concepts in public spaces. I am fascinated by the ways in which audiences respond to public performances, and I have researched this in both my performance work and through academic research.

The encountering of visceral experiences through the physical, sensory and emotional archaeology of an edifice is an inspiring premise. I am interested in looking at the envelope of a building, thinking about the site, ruminating over its purpose, imagining who’s been there before, and sensing who’s there now. It is fascinating to contemplate how a space may change over time, or even in a moment. Wrapped within a site, it is exciting to imagine how the space could be transformed through music and movement by responding to surfaces and textures, floors and ceilings, nooks and corners, light, dark and all shades in between, constructing a physical audio-active foundation for the building.”

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Katherine Atkinson responds to Jessica Foleys work ‘Elsies Counter’ as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation The Legs Foundation’ at Highlanes Gallery (2013)

Biography

Katherine Atkinson holds an MA in Public Culture Studies from Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, a Diploma in Theatre and Drama Studies from NUI, Maynooth, a Diploma in Teaching (Arts) SACAE, a Certificate of Music TAFE. She performed at the launch of The Trades Club Revival publication by Seamus Nolan in the Model, Sligo (2012), performed in ‘Tear Down The Walls’ by Project Brand New, directed by artist Geraldine Pilgrim as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival (2011). She has performed with Ann Scott, Dave Murphy, Alice Jago, Miriam Ingram and performed in ‘Sending Letters to the Sea’ a collaborative music project by Mark Garry, a Public Art Commission, FCC (2009). Katherine is a member of Visual Arts Ireland and manages Professional Development with Create, the national development agency for collaborative arts.

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Katherine Atkinson responds to Meadhbh O’Connor’s work ‘Evergreen’ as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ at Highlanes Gallery (2013)

At the opening of Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation, Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, May 2013

At the opening of Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation, Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, May 2013

After its initial introduction The LFTT Library returned to The Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda in May 2013 for its first commissioned exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ in supported by the Drogheda arts Festival, Louth County Council and Highlanes Gallery. The exhibition was co-curated by Aoife Ruane, director of Highlanes Gallery and Helen Horgan of The LFTT Library. Eight artists were invited to make new work in response to items from the Library collection; Vivienne Byrne, Aoife Desmond, Danyel Ferrari, Jessica Foley, Helen Horgan, Aine Ivers, Susan MacWilliam and Meadhbh O’Connor. The show remained in the gallery from May 5th until August 27th 2013. During this time a programme of lectures, events and performances took place in the gallery. Local ballad band Rapscallion played on the opening night. See related posts for more. Read More

536940_440225662735579_740508828_nThe LFTT Library spent four months at The Guesthouse, Cork in early 2013 (Feb-May). For the launch night sound artist and Guesthouse Director Mick O’Shea performed with guest readers who chose sections from the library to mix with the set. To paraphrase Mick; these collaborative sessions are as much an exercise in listening and in silence as they are in creating sound.

525037_440935672664578_1996467017_n Read More

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