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Angelika Hoger ‘Laufzeitanalyse’ (Videoloop ca. 1 hour, part one and part two) (2008)

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The internet seating area.

Angelika Höger (DE) is a german artist from Bielefeld in the Black Forest, Germany who was on resident at The Guesthouse in collaboration with the library in October 2014. Höger works in kinetic sculpture and installation, often with found domestic objects; a practice she calls ‘Housewife Engineering’. Over an introductory drink Myself and Angelika had been discussing our ideal reading space and I brought her to a favourite cafe of mine in Cork, The Webworkhouse (www.webworkhouse.com). Most commonly frequented by travellers and local students, the Webworkhouse cafe provides a constant background hum of indiscernible foreign chatter that I find conducive to a good read. Angelika had expressed an interest in working with The LFTT library as an installation which I was of course interested in, as one of the primary reasons for the ‘new build’ of the shelving system would be to make the structure more malleable as building material. This initial intervention (although modest) instantly made visible further possibilities for alternative functions of the libraries modular architecture. The LFTT ‘Internet Cafe’ included cafe style seating; the photocopy station and lounge area; an international maps wall (to provide orientation) and the internet space itself – two pcs, which in place of streaming the information superhighway which is the world wide web were screening Angelika’s two part video work ‘Laufzeitanalyse’ in which one snail and a group of snails traverse a hamster wheel at a speed barely perceptible to the human eye, foraging on a piece of garden lettuce. Humourous, playful, and visually-philosophically succinct, this work was in keeping with subverting the expected function of the environment and its materials.

Helen Horgan

Angelika Hoger ‘Laufzeitanalyse’ (Videoloop ca. 1 hour, part one and part two) (2008)

“This two videoloops show a breadboard construction. In part one a snail is creeping in a hamsterwheel covered with salad leafs to make it more comfortable for her. The snail is moving very slowly but constantly for nearly one hour. You can hardly see the wheel moving. Of course the snail stays always in the lower section of the turning wheel. The cross-tie of the wheel is turning slowly around, reminding a bit of a clock hand. In part two nine snails are creeping inside the same hamsterwheel. One goes left, one right, one starts to creep upwards, another stucks at the ground … The wheel is moving even more slow, sometimes it doesn´t move at all, sometimes it turns to the other direction. I used to show part one and part two at the same time side by side or on top of each other. A nice chance to watch the potentialization of slowness”

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The lounge area with photocopy station.

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In the photocopier – a self published newspaper of the works of ‘Artist Unlimited’ – the live/work collective where Angelika stays in Bielefeld. http://www.artists-unlimited.de/



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The cafe seating area.

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The international maps wall (for orientation).

 

 

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Previously a resident at The Guesthouse, Polish artist Aga Tamiola later became involved in ‘Scale Factor’ after borrowing two books from the library on leaving; ‘Fishers of Men’ by Maxence van der Meersch and ‘Man’s Place in The Universe: A Study of the Results of Scientific Research in Relation to the Unity or Plurality of Worlds’ by Alfred R. Wallace. ‘Scale Factor’ was an exhibition of small works which travelled from Poland to The Guesthouse Cork for September 2014, curated by Tomasz Madajczak, Bartosz Nowak (Poland); Sharon McCarthy and Helen Horgan for the LFTT Library (Cork). The work as shown was collaboration between Tamiola and The LFTT who interpreted the artists instructions for install from two to three dimensions within certain parameters.

Born and raised in Stargard, Poland, Aga Tamiola is a multimedia artist living and working out of  Berlin and London.  Her geographical and linguistic misplacement led her to focus on a visual reflection on the aspects of loss, identity and belonging in the context of globalisation and new technologies. Aga’s nomadic approach to explore mutability of matter manifests itself in sculptural assemblages fusing materials and processes.

In her most recent series, Vanishing Voices, Aga reflected on the relationship between thought, language, geography and culture by conducting a series of nonfigurative experiments highlighting similarities and differences among the languages of the Arctic Circle.

This multimedia series was the beginning of material exploration for Aga. While observing stages of dying languages, she developed an audio-visual language to depict the linguistic processes involved. She applied a variety of materials spanning from textile, plaster and plastic to metal and glass. At this stage she discovered the human body from a sculptural perspective, which coincided with an awareness of the sculptural qualities of sound waves. This led to the human voice coming to the forefront of her installations, sound pieces and performances.

A very important part of Aga’s practice is collaboration. She looks for spaces to explore her own ideas in dialogue and experiments with others. In 2013, she co-founded the sonic arts collective Random Order. In 2014, she started questioning the breakthrough discoveries of neuroscience through sonic storytelling, performances, screenings and object making in the audio-visual project,Emergency Kit for Neuroskeptics.

http://www.agatamiola.com/lftt-library/

AGA-SCALEFACTOR01 AGA-SCALEFACTOR02

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Forget Lygia Return to make use of pleasure, Into the whirlpool' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text  'Quo Vadis' by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

‘Forget Lygia
Return to make use of pleasure,
Into the whirlpool’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Quo Vadis’ by Henryk Sienkiewicz (1895)

'Humility will Always go clad in scarlet Pride is too good for gold' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Heretics' by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

‘Humility will
Always go clad in scarlet
Pride is too good for gold’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Heretics’ by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

'Humility will Always go clad in scarlet Pride is too good for gold' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Heretics' by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

‘Humility will
Always go clad in scarlet
Pride is too good for gold’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Heretics’ by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

'Running up Meath Street With tiny ears like new shells Just lost his young wife' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'The Glamour of Dublin' by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

‘Running up Meath Street
With tiny ears like new shells
Just lost his young wife’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘The Glamour of Dublin’ by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

'Running up Meath Street With tiny ears like new shells Just lost his young wife' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'The Glamour of Dublin' by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

‘Running up Meath Street
With tiny ears like new shells
Just lost his young wife’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘The Glamour of Dublin’ by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

'A crammed battle With major elements of spite Just then a message' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Patton: Ordeal and Triumph' by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘A crammed battle
With major elements of spite
Just then a message’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Patton: Ordeal and Triumph’ by Ladislas Farago (1969)

'A crammed battle With major elements of spite Just then a message' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Patton: Ordeal and Triumph' by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘A crammed battle
With major elements of spite
Just then a message’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Patton: Ordeal and Triumph’ by Ladislas Farago (1969)

"Concerning the spoils Use indulgence and command without loud speaking' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Sales Koran'.

“Concerning the spoils
Use indulgence and command
without loud speaking’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Sales Koran’.

"Concerning the spoils Use indulgence and command without loud speaking' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Sales Koran'.

“Concerning the spoils
Use indulgence and command
without loud speaking’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Sales Koran’.

‘Haiku House’ was a collaborative interdisciplinary event looking at the Haiku form, which took place at The Guesthouse in July 2014 as part of The Avant Festival. Cork based visual artist and curator Róisín Foley and Helen Horgan of The LFTT worked together for the event. Haiku’s were written by Helen Horgan using the texts from the library. Foley responded to these texts with delicate poetic sculptural interventions. For more or Róisíns work see http://roisinfoley.wordpress.com/

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

In May 2013 Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy performed live in The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’. Mick and Irene regularly perform as part of sound-art and performance collective Strange Attractor. They are both instrumental in the experimental sound-art scene which Cork city has become renowned for, which also includes Danny McCarthy David Stalling and Anthony Kelly and others. https://www.facebook.com/StrangeAttractorIreland

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O'Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

Mick O’Shea and Irene Murphy of Strange Attractor performing live at The LFTT Library at Highlanes Gallery May 2013.

60.HIGHLANES

Katherine Atkinson performs on the altar of Highlanes Gallery in response to the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ (2013)

In August 2013 violinist and performance artist Katherine Atkinson was  invited to respond to The LFTT exhibition Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation at Highlanes Gallery. She decided to stem her performance quite literally from the individual works themselves, enacting an intimate one-one-one engagement with the textures and forms they evoked. It was quite ‘spellbinding’!

Katherine’s work is inspired by physical theatre, using strong visual images as part of the performance. When performing the violin becomes an extension of her physical self, another part of her body as well as an extension of her voice. Inspired by physical theatre, Atkinson uses strong visual images as part of her performance, often responding to specific architectures and environments in an exploration of the boundaries between public and private space.

Katherine says of her practice “I am interested in testing performance concepts in public spaces. I am fascinated by the ways in which audiences respond to public performances, and I have researched this in both my performance work and through academic research.

The encountering of visceral experiences through the physical, sensory and emotional archaeology of an edifice is an inspiring premise. I am interested in looking at the envelope of a building, thinking about the site, ruminating over its purpose, imagining who’s been there before, and sensing who’s there now. It is fascinating to contemplate how a space may change over time, or even in a moment. Wrapped within a site, it is exciting to imagine how the space could be transformed through music and movement by responding to surfaces and textures, floors and ceilings, nooks and corners, light, dark and all shades in between, constructing a physical audio-active foundation for the building.”

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Katherine Atkinson responds to Jessica Foleys work ‘Elsies Counter’ as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation The Legs Foundation’ at Highlanes Gallery (2013)

Biography

Katherine Atkinson holds an MA in Public Culture Studies from Dun Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology, a Diploma in Theatre and Drama Studies from NUI, Maynooth, a Diploma in Teaching (Arts) SACAE, a Certificate of Music TAFE. She performed at the launch of The Trades Club Revival publication by Seamus Nolan in the Model, Sligo (2012), performed in ‘Tear Down The Walls’ by Project Brand New, directed by artist Geraldine Pilgrim as part of the Dublin Theatre Festival (2011). She has performed with Ann Scott, Dave Murphy, Alice Jago, Miriam Ingram and performed in ‘Sending Letters to the Sea’ a collaborative music project by Mark Garry, a Public Art Commission, FCC (2009). Katherine is a member of Visual Arts Ireland and manages Professional Development with Create, the national development agency for collaborative arts.

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Katherine Atkinson responds to Meadhbh O’Connor’s work ‘Evergreen’ as part of the exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ at Highlanes Gallery (2013)

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