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11225111_869083379849803_4274438807110613384_oHow can language be otherwise heard, seen, tasted or touched by and for its reader? How can reading and re-writing be a collaborative, sensory experience? In what way does the transformation of text from one medium or language into another effect its cultural perception?

10257452_869083426516465_5819634508259476141_oIn June 2015 The LFTT Library comes to Artists Unlimited as part of The LFTT Library Translation Tour, a 4,000km road-trip and practical exercise in cross-country re-interpretation. In collaboration with artist Angelika Höger The LFTT library will expand on it’s meaning potential by opening itself up to ‘foreign’ readings. A specially curated selection of the library has been made which includes books from the natural sciences, gardening, practical instruction manuals and new age self help guides and forms a kind of cultural ‘how-to’. The project asks; How do personal and local differences effect this idea of the universal ‘manual’? Are technologies like google translate enough to bridge the gap, or is something more like a real time conversation required? 

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This selection, which will remain at Artists Unlimited under the care of Höger until summer 2016, was launched in the gallery on the 12th of June, allowing artists and audiences the chance to meet the library and discuss further potential involvement with the project at Artists Unlimited over the course of the coming year. (Images above show the ‘Paper Work’ room at Artists Unlimited, Bielefeld. June 2015)

11221664_869083629849778_8622059018532434820_oIn addition LFTT Director, Helen Horgan invited participants to become part of The LFTT Library Tour: Film in Translation, the ongoing film document of the tour, by contributing ‘misreadings’ and ‘mistranslations’ stemming from the alien content of the newly re-contextualised books. Interested participants were invited to select from the library short texts which exhibit curious difficulties in understanding, whether stemming from language barriers or locally found confusions.  These texts/confusions will be worked on and transformed becoming part of the narrative of the film as a document of ‘translation in action’. If you are interested in getting involved with The LFTT Library at Artists Unlimited or would like to learn more email The LFTT at thelfttlibrary@gmail.com or (Artists Unlimited) Angelika Höger at engelwurtz@gmx.net .
http://www.artists-unlimited.de/

11143474_869084266516381_5179822305932378096_oAn idea with reach is said to have “legs” and the word translation was historically used as a term to describe the movement of objects, particularly sacred ones, from place to place. (Image above shows the ‘Music Work’ room at Artists Unlimited, Bielefeld. June 2015)

10317721_869084256516382_4541769742865759589_oKindly supported by Culture Ireland.

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Angelika Hoger ‘Laufzeitanalyse’ (Videoloop ca. 1 hour, part one and part two) (2008)

Angelika Höger (DE) is a german artist based in Bielefeld, North-Rhine Westphalia, Germany who was on resident at The Guesthouse in collaboration with the library in October 2014. Höger works in kinetic sculpture and installation, often with found domestic objects; a practice she calls ‘Housewife Engineering’. Over an introductory drink Myself and Angelika had been discussing our ideal reading space and I brought her to a favourite cafe of mine in Cork, The Webworkhouse (www.webworkhouse.com). Most commonly frequented by travellers and local students, the Webworkhouse cafe provides a constant background hum of indiscernible foreign chatter that I find conducive to a good read. Angelika had expressed an interest in working with The LFTT library as an installation which I was of course interested in, as one of the primary reasons for the ‘new build’ of the shelving system would be to make the structure more malleable as building material. This initial intervention (although modest) instantly made visible further possibilities for alternative functions of the libraries modular architecture. The LFTT ‘Internet Cafe’ included cafe style seating; the photocopy station and lounge area; an international maps wall (to provide orientation) and the internet space itself – two pcs, which in place of streaming the information superhighway which is the world wide web were screening Angelika’s two part video work ‘Laufzeitanalyse’ in which one snail and a group of snails traverse a hamster wheel at a speed barely perceptible to the human eye, foraging on a piece of garden lettuce. Humourous, playful, and visually-philosophically succinct, this work was in keeping with subverting the expected function of the environment and its materials.

Helen Horgan Read More

At the opening of Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation, Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, May 2013

At the opening of Things In Translation: The Legs Foundation, Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda, May 2013

After its initial introduction The LFTT Library returned to The Highlanes Gallery, Drogheda in May 2013 for its first commissioned exhibition ‘Things in Translation: The Legs Foundation’ in supported by the Drogheda arts Festival, Louth County Council and Highlanes Gallery. The exhibition was co-curated by Aoife Ruane, director of Highlanes Gallery and Helen Horgan of The LFTT Library. Eight artists were invited to make new work in response to items from the Library collection; Vivienne Byrne, Aoife Desmond, Danyel Ferrari, Jessica Foley, Helen Horgan, Aine Ivers, Susan MacWilliam and Meadhbh O’Connor. The show remained in the gallery from May 5th until August 27th 2013. During this time a programme of lectures, events and performances took place in the gallery. Local ballad band Rapscallion played on the opening night. See related posts for more. Read More

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Photo by Jimmy Wheldon

After Completion was a ritual performance devised by artist Monica Flynn in response to content from the LFTT Library and was held at Highlanes Gallery Drogheda on October 5th, while The Library was on residency there. In the artists words…

After Completion involved 9 performers in a ritual action exploring our innate instinct to bear together.  The piece was developed in response to my interest in accounts of mysticism within the LFTT Library.  My thanks to artist Helen Horgan and Aoife Ruane and staff at the Highlanes Gallery for the opportunity to realise this work and to my fellow performers: Irene Bagnall; Catherine Barragry; Vivienne Byrne; Jessica Foley; Joan Healy; Aoife McKeon; Deirdre Morrissey and Grainne Rafferty. Read More

DSC_4312On Friday the 5th of October we held a talk in The Library about the projects history so far. The talk was very well attended and there was a lot of questions from the audience. It was one of the first times I became aware of how much the project could mean to the public. In casual conversation with other art practioners there was often the belief that I may have taken on something potentially useless and/or antiquated. The response from the public began to show a very real interest in the heritage of the collection. Sometimes this concern for preservation went to the extreme and there was expressions to the effect that the books might better be kept in a more stable and controlled environment, away from the touches of (artists and the publics) grubby hands. Of course with a traveling library this isn’t possible, or probably even necessary. The librarian at Dublins Marshes Library (the countries oldest) told me she encourages the public to handle their ancient tomes without gloves, bare handed, since the older books (pre 1900’s) are actually made of sturdier stuff than those made by contemporary processes. In any case, nothing, not even a library, lasts forever.