Roisin Foley at ‘Haiku House’

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Thanks to windows You were content to be In two trick places at once' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'While The Humour is on Me' by John D. Sheridan (1954)

‘Thanks to windows
You were content to be
In two trick places at once’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘While The Humour is on Me’ by John D. Sheridan (1954)

'Humility will Always go clad in scarlet Pride is too good for gold' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Heretics' by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

‘Humility will
Always go clad in scarlet
Pride is too good for gold’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Heretics’ by G.K. Chesterton (1905)

'Running up Meath Street With tiny ears like new shells Just lost his young wife' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'The Glamour of Dublin' by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

‘Running up Meath Street
With tiny ears like new shells
Just lost his young wife’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘The Glamour of Dublin’ by D.L. Kelleher (1919)

'A crammed battle With major elements of spite Just then a message' Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text 'Patton: Ordeal and Triumph' by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘A crammed battle
With major elements of spite
Just then a message’
Sculpture by Róisín Foley; Text by Helen Horgan; Original text ‘Patton: Ordeal and Triumph’ by Ladislas Farago (1969)

‘Haiku House’ was a collaborative interdisciplinary event looking at the Haiku form, which took place at The Guesthouse in July 2014 as part of The Avant Festival. Cork based visual artist and curator Róisín Foley and Helen Horgan of The LFTT worked together for the event. Haiku’s were written by Helen Horgan using the texts from the library. Foley responded to these texts with delicate poetic sculptural interventions. For more or Róisíns work see http://roisinfoley.wordpress.com/

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